Real Estate Information Archive

Blog

Displaying blog entries 1-5 of 5

see full article here

8 Time-Saving Meal Prep Ideas Nutritionists Actually Use

Food hacks for busy people.

JULIA NAFTULIN 
January 11, 2018

If you're trying to clean up your diet, preparing your own meals is key. But when you come home exhausted after a long day at work, the last thing you want to do is dice onions or wait around for a chicken to roast.  

 

Chop a bunch of veggies

 

If you're prepping meals just for yourself or one other person, it shouldn't take more than an hour to wash, peel, and chop all the vegetables you'll need for the entire week ahead. Julie Upton, RD, suggests prepping enough greens for four to five days, so you'll have them to toss into a stir-fry, throw in a sheet pan, or even munch raw.

Don't love the idea of breaking out a cutting board and dirtying up your kitchen counter? "Buy pre-chopped veggies to make a quick meal," suggests Brooke Alpert, RD, author of The Diet Detox. Sure the pre-cut kind are more expensive, but if it helps you eat healthier, it may be worth the extra cash.

 

Cook one or two protein sources

 

Pan-fry chicken breasts, grill salmon fillets, or hard-boil a half-dozen eggs at once, and you'll have versatile, high-quality protein that can last the entire workweek. Upton has a trick for prepping a large serving of chicken: "I will Instant Pot a whole chicken, then I'll use the cooked chicken during the week for various dishes like soup or casseroles." 

Vegans and vegetarians can steal this hack too by cooking a big pot of lentils, chickpeas, or beans all at once, with an eye toward adding them to veggie-based dishes all week long.

Pack food in storage containers

 

Pick up food storage containers in varying sizes, so you have places to separate and stash pre-made veggies, sauces, protein, and other items. The containers will help them stay fresh too. "I also like to use rectangular glass meal prep containers, so they can be refrigerated, and then baked, and/or microwaved straight from refrigerator," says Sharon Palmer, RDN.

For some foods, plastic bags work just as well. Katherine Brooking, MS, RD, suggests storing your prepared veggies in plastic baggies in the proper proportions for the meals you plan to eat. "I put them in an air-tight baggie with a date so I can just grab and use during the week."

Keep measuring cups nearby

 

Once you have containers filled with a week's worth of food, it can be hard to eyeball the proper serving size for one meal. Cynthia Sass, MPH, Health's contributing nutrition editor, suggests leaving clean measuring cups in the fridge on top of your food containers.

"I can just scoop them out in the right proportions," Sass says. "I aim for two cups of veggies, a half cup of cooked pulses (beans, lentils, chickpeas), or a half cup of wild salmon salad, and a half cup of cooked starch (sweet potato, quinoa, brown rice, purple potato)."

Double up on servings

 

When whipping up dinner for her family, Upton makes extra servings of vegetables, grains, and chicken to use as ingredients for future meals. It's a no-brainer way to keep your prep time minimal yet always have ingredients ready for a quick, fresh dish the next night. "For example, extra veggies become fillers for frittatas," she says. 

Keep measuring cups nearby

 

Once you have containers filled with a week's worth of food, it can be hard to eyeball the proper serving size for one meal. Cynthia Sass, MPH, Health's contributing nutrition editor, suggests leaving clean measuring cups in the fridge on top of your food containers.

"I can just scoop them out in the right proportions," Sass says. "I aim for two cups of veggies, a half cup of cooked pulses (beans, lentils, chickpeas), or a half cup of wild salmon salad, and a half cup of cooked starch (sweet potato, quinoa, brown rice, purple potato)."

Double up on servings

 

When whipping up dinner for her family, Upton makes extra servings of vegetables, grains, and chicken to use as ingredients for future meals. It's a no-brainer way to keep your prep time minimal yet always have ingredients ready for a quick, fresh dish the next night. "For example, extra veggies become fillers for frittatas," she says. 

To get our best food and nutrition tips delivered to you inbox, sign up for the Healthy Living newsletter

Rely on a few versatile recipes

 

"The secret to meal prep is finding a basic recipe that you really enjoy and that works in a few different ways," says Palmer. She likes to make a large batch of turmeric rice, then top it with different veggies and protein throughout the week. Tweaking the same simple yet delicious recipe keeps your meals fresh and satisfying, but they do away with the stress of making a new dish every night. Palmer suggests stocking up on whole grains, kale, or pasta, which work well as the bases of many hearty, healthy dinners.

see full article here

Here’s What to Eat for Lunch If You’re Trying to Slim Down, According to a Nutritionist

Whether you prep ahead or grab take-out, these energizing options will help you power through your day.

CYNTHIA SASS, MPH, RD 
January 08, 2018

 

Breakfast gets all the glory as the most important meal. But lunch plays a key role in your day too, especially for anyone trying to slim down. If your midday meals are too skimpy, you may overeat at dinner; while too-heavy lunches can make you sleepy and sluggish—not the ideal mindset for your ongoing weight-loss efforts. Below are five options that strike just the right balance, to help you power through your afternoon and drop pounds healthfully. Each contains plenty of nutrient-rich veggies, lean protein, and beneficial fat, along with a small portion of good carbs (enough to energize you but not enough to keep you from losing weight). 

If you're all about efficiency ...

 

One of the simplest strategies I recommend is making a double portion of dinner, and packing the leftovers for lunch the next day. Include two baseball-sized portions of green veggies, prepped with EVOO and seasonings. (Think leafy greens dressed with EVOO, balsamic, and herbs; or EVOO and herb sautéed or oven-roasted spinach, kale, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, asparagus, green beans, or zucchini.) Add a portion of cooked lean protein, such as a half cup of pulses, like lentils or beans, or three ounces of poultry or seafood. And include a half cup of a nutrient-rich starch, such as yam, sweet potato, skin-on fingerlings, quinoa, brown, or wild rice. To keep it interesting, change up the combos, herbs, and spices while maintaining the same overall proportions.

If you're into meal prepping ...

 

You can’t go wrong with a simple stir-fry. In a medium pan over low heat, sauté a quarter cup of minced yellow onion in one-third cup of low-sodium vegetable broth until translucent. Add a cup of broccoli and a half cup each of chopped red bell pepper and shredded purple cabbage. Stir in a teaspoon of minced garlic, a quarter teaspoon of fresh grated ginger, one-eighth teaspoon each of crushed red pepper and black pepper, and sauté until veggies are slightly tender. Add a serving of cooked lean protein to heat through, such as three ounces of chopped chicken breast or a half cup of black-eyed peas. Serve over a half cup of cooked brown or wild rice, and garnish with a quarter cup of sliced almonds.

If you appreciate an Insta-worthy meal...

 

It’s true that we eat with our eyes as well as our stomachs. Many of my clients say that beautifully crafted meals help them stay on track with healthy eating, and feel more satiated. One trend that hasn’t fizzled out is mason jar salads: Fill the bottom with a half cup of oven-roasted sweet potato or purple potato. Add layers of dark leafy greens, alternating with sliced grape tomatoes, shredded carrots, and yellow bell pepper; and top with three ounces of canned wild salmon or a half cup of cooked red lentils. Just before you’re ready to eat, top the salad with a dressing made from two tablespoons of tahini, thinned with one and a half tablespoons of water, and seasoned with a teaspoon each of fresh lemon juice and minced garlic, and one-eighth teaspoon each of sea salt and cayenne pepper. Post your Instagram pic, then dive in.

If you're grabbing takeout ...

 

It's a common misconception that sushi is a healthy and slimming lunch. The truth is, sushi rolls are generally packed with white rice, and include a scant amount of protein and veggies. A better Japanese takeout option is a salad with ginger dressing, three ounces of sashimi or seared tuna, a side of avocado, and small side of brown rice. Craving Mexican? Order an entree salad (no fried shell), made from a base of greens and grilled veggies, dressed with pico de gallo, topped with black beans, chicken or fish (or just beans for a veg option), and sliced avocado or guacamole.

If you prefer to graze...

No time to sit down to an actual meal? Nibble on finger foods that add up a balanced lunch. Include a few handfuls of raw veggies (like sliced cucumber, red bell pepper or celery) with a quarter cup of olive tapenade or guacamole, or a few tablespoons of seasoned tahini or almond butter for dipping. For protein, include a half cup of oven-roasted chickpeas, a few hard-boiled eggs, or three ounces of chilled, sliced grilled chicken breast. Round it out with a serving (about three cups) of popped popcorn. Munch away at your leisure.

Cynthia Sass is Health’s contributing nutrition editor, a New York Times best-selling author, and a consultant for the New York Yankees and Brooklyn Nets.


See full article here

9 Kitchen Hacks That Will Make Healthy Eating So Much Easier

This is the year that you’ll eat better—and spend less time cooking. Win-win.

JESSICA MIGALA 
December 29, 2017

 

We’ve all been there: You come home from a long day at work and you’re exhausted. You’re so hungry, you could start gnawing on your arm at any moment. Nothing sounds good, and at the same time everything sounds good—so you start munching on the bag of chips as you plan your meal, and before long you're not even hungry for dinner.

Luckily, learning a few smart kitchen hacks can help you throw together fast, simple, and healthy meals on even the busiest nights. And tapping into your inner chef is good for your health, too: A recent study in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine found that home-cooked meals help you stick to the dietary guidelines (more fruit, veggies, beans, whole grains, dairy, and seafood; less sodium and refined grains) and save money while you're at it.

We asked registered dietitians to share their strategies that make planning, prepping, and cooking easier, so you can get right to eating. Pretty soon, using them will become second nature and the "What should I make?" dinnertime crisis will become a thing of the past. Now, all you have to do is decide what you’re going to do with your extra free time. Self-care, anyone?

Go for freezer fish

The American Heart Association recommends eating two servings of fish per week, especially fatty fish like salmon or mackerel. To make that happen, pick up fish that can go from your freezer straight to your oven, suggests Vicki Shanta Retelny, RD, a nutritionist based in the Chicago area. Typically, frozen fish should be thawed before cooking, but "some brands are marinated, individually wrapped, and can be cooked from frozen, like Morey’s or No Name," she says. (Look for phrases like "no need to thaw" or "from freezer to oven" on the package.) Also smart: Pick up a bag of pre-cooked, peeled, and deveined frozen shrimp (a great source of low-cal protein) to quickly heat up and add to pasta dishes, stir-fries, and salads.

Don’t go crazy with Sunday prep

If you love getting all your veggies, proteins, and grains cooked for the week ahead, more power to you. But if it’s become something you dread, feel free to skip it. "It’s easy to get overwhelmed with meal prep," says Amy Gorin, MS, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in the New York City area. Instead, she recommends taking the prep down a few notches by just chopping a couple ingredients that you can incorporate into easy, healthy meals. For example, Gorin keeps sliced mushrooms and onions on hand for stir-fries or omelets; it removes some of the prep-cook burden, and you don’t have to start dinner from scratch every night.

Pick out fun store-bought short cuts

No one actually likes to peel and cube a butternut squash. Or mince garlic, or chop Brussel's sprouts. That’s why store-bought prepped produce can be a lifesaver. "They may be a little pricier, but they can save time and help you eat healthier at home in the long run," says Lindsay Livingston, RD, a nutritionist in Columbus, Ohio. Look for creatively prepped veggies to jazz up meals, like spiralized carrots and zucchini (found in many grocery stores, including Trader Joe’s), shredded Brussel’s sprouts, or bagged cauliflower rice.

 

Make smoothie cups

What’s better than a blend-and-go smoothie when you’re running out the door? Pre-pack an individual container with fruit, nut butter, and any other additions (think coconut, greens, cocoa powder, chia seeds, or cashews). The next morning, dump the bowl into your blender and add your liquid of choice (milk, nut milk, kefir). Gorin always keeps frozen wild blueberries in her freezer ("they pack more than twice the antioxidants of regular blueberries," she says), and combines them with plain Greek yogurt, milk, peanut butter, banana, and a tiny bit of maple syrup.

Keep these go-to foods on hand

There are days when you come home and think, What am I going to eat? Always have quick-cooking 10-minute grains on hand, like bulgur or barley, says Retelny. Toss with ready-to-eat bagged salad greens, and throw on a pre-seasoned package of tuna or salmon. This meal comes together superfast, so you can eat well even on the busiest weeknights.

 

More staples to keep in the house, according to Holley Grainger, RD, a nutritionist in Birmingham, Alabama: eggs, canned vegetables and beans, cooked chicken in the freezer, jarred spaghetti sauce, hummus, veggies, noodles, and frozen pizza. Yep, frozen pizza can fit into your healthy eating plan: You can jazz it up by adding more veggies on top.

Stock up on sauces

Even though Pinterest may tell you otherwise, "every night doesn’t have to be an elaborate dinner with specific recipes," says Livingston. To make dinner new and interesting, change up the flavors with sauce. Livingston recommends keeping a running list of simple sauces (tahini dressingThai peanut) that you can quickly throw together to top your favorite protein, whole grain, and veggies.

Get yourself a fast cooker

Pressure cookers are all the rage right now, and for good reason: This genius device truly puts dinner on the table in a flash by allowing you to cook foods faster so you can have a full meal ready in less than 30 minutes. These pots can even handle frozen meats (a slow cooker cannot). You can't go wrong with the Instant Pot 6-Quart ($75; amazon.com), an Amazon bestseller with over 23,000 reviews.

 

Streamline shopping

If whipping up a complicated grocery list is too overwhelming (or you don't even want to bother with meal planning), ditch it completely. Instead, Grainger recommends this simple, winning formula to make getting your grocery haul less of a hassle. Two or three proteins, one or two bags of lettuce, two to three fruits, two to three veggies, one to two grains, milk (or milk alternative), and sauces as needed. "You'll have the components you need to throw together a last-minute dish," she says. Bonus: Doing it this way allows you to choose items you see on sale, which helps keep your weeknight meals new and fresh.

Don’t be afraid to make too much

Whenever you can, double a recipe and freeze half. Freezer meals can save you after a busy day, since all you have to do is pop it into the microwave or a pot on the stove. "It’s usually not much more work than cooking a single recipe, and it gives you a well-stocked freezer for busy weeks when you don’t have a lot of time to plan or cook," says Livingston. Freezing homemade leftovers also saves you a significant amount of money per serving compared to brand name, ready-to-eat freezer meals—plus, you don’t have to worry about extra sodium, sugar, or preservatives in the mix. Now get cooking!

See full article here

3 Ways Mindful Eating Can Help You Stay Slim

Mindfulness is all the rage right now, and for good reason. Not only does this wellness technique help you quell stress and get through the day feeling more zen-like, but it can also trigger a host of other health benefits. Studies have found that mindfulness may help reduce inflammation, increase happiness, improve sleep quality, slim down your belly, and even regulate your appetite

Those last two benefits have us intrigued. Turns out mindfulness for weight loss and maintaining a healthy BMI can be so transformative, many nutritionists are recommending it to their clients as a way to eat more healthfully. Mindful eating can help you improve your digestion, reduce bloating, recognize when you’re full, and stop overeating. It can also change the way food tastes. Being present during meals means you’ll become even more aware of every bite and flavor, and you’ll likely end up enjoying your food way more. 

Watch the video: 7 Ways to Get Slim Without a Diet

But how exactly do you quit your habit of scarfing down your meal without a second thought? It takes a bit of practice—habit changing doesn’t happen overnight, after all! Several strategies can help guide you to becoming a more mindful muncher. Watch this video to learn three effective yet simple tips. 

Read full article- click here

13 Healthy High-Fat Foods You Should Eat More

Low fat is officially over! Here are more than a dozen high-fat superstars you can and should enjoy as part of your healthy diet.

Selene Yeager

 

Fat is back

 

We don't have to tell you what a disaster the low-fat craze was. We all stopped eating many of our favorite foods thinking they were bad for us (welcome back, eggs and dark chocolate!) and ended up overweight, overly full of refined carbs, and sick. In the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, for the first time in 35 years, the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services removed the limit on total fat consumption in the American diet (though they still recommend getting less than 10% of daily calories from saturated fat). In their words, evidence clearly shows that eating more foods rich in healthful fats like nuts, vegetable oils, and fish have protective effects, particularly for cardiovascular disease. They also help you absorb a host of vitamins, fill you up so you eat less, and taste good, too. Here are 13 healthy high fat foods to stock up on to celebrate.

Types of fat

 

Fat comes in many forms, including:

Unsaturated: Liquid at room temperature and generally considered heart healthy. Found in plants like nuts, seeds, vegetable oils, and seafood.
Saturated: Solid at room temperature and found in animal foods, like meat and butter, as well as coconut and palm oil. Often deemed unhealthy for your heart, but research is equivocal. "Some sources are actually good for us," says Brianna Elliott, RD, a nutritionist based in St. Paul, Minn.
Trans: Liquid fats made solid through a process called hydrogenation. Found in fried foods, baked goods, and processed snack foods. These heart-health wreckers were banned from the food supply in 2015. They'll be gone by 2018.

"What really matters is where the source of fat is coming from. The fats found in processed junk foods and store-bought baked goods aren't so good for us, while fat from more natural foods like avocados, grass-fed beef, and olives can be beneficial" says Elliott.

Olive Oil

 

Olive oil is the original healthy fat. A tall body of research finds that it helps lower your risk for heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Most recently, Spanish researchers publishing in the journal Molecules reported that the various components of olive oil including oleic acid and secoiridoids protect your body on the cellular level to slow the aging process. "To get the most health benefits, choose extra-virgin olive oil, as it is extracted using natural methods and doesn’t go through as much processing before it reaches your plate," says Elliott. Research shows that veggies sautéed in olive oil are also richer in antioxidants than boiled ones—and they taste better too! Don't go crazy though. All fats are relatively high in calories and 1 tablespoon of olive oil has about 120 calories.

Fish

 

You may have heard your mother or grandmother describe fish as "brain food." That’s because these swimmers are brimming with omega-3 fatty acids, which are essential for brain function, says Elliot. "Your brain is made up of mostly fat, so you need to consume them in order to stay sharp and healthy," she says. The new Dietary Guidelines recommend eating 8 ounces per week to get healthy amounts of polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), all of which feed your brain and fight inflammation and chronic disease. If you're concerned about mercury, choose salmon, anchovies, herring, shad

Avocados

 

Avocados do more than provide the keystone ingredient for amazing guac. They also help lower inflammation, which is linked to cardiovascular disease. In a 2014 study, a team of Mexican researchers fed a group of rats too much sugar, which gave them symptoms of metabolic syndrome, including high blood sugar, cholesterol, and triglycerides. They then fed the rats avocado oil, which lowered levels of triglycerides and LDL (bad) cholesterol in their blood, while keeping protective HDL cholesterol levels intact. "You need to consume healthy fats in order for your body to absorb fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K—pair them with a salad so you can reap the benefits of all those veggies!" says Elliot. Keep your overall calorie intake in mind; one avocado is about 320 calories. An easy way to get a good dose is with avocado toast, which can work as a complete breakfast, snack, lunch or even an easy dinner.

Eggs

 

The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines lifted the longstanding hard limit on cholesterol, as many researchers now believe the cholesterol you eat doesn't have that much bearing on the amount of artery-clogging LDL cholesterol floating in your bloodstream, and that saturated fat (like fatty meats) and genetic makeup are the real driving force behind dangerously high cholesterol. That's good news, since research finds that eating eggs in the morning can help you feel full and satisfied longer, making it easier to resist those pastries in your office pantry. "Eggs from hens that are raised on pastures or fed omega-3 enriched feed tend to be higher in omega-3s," says Elliot.

Tree nuts

 

Nuts are nature's most perfect portable snack. Each handful packs a powerhouse of nutrients including amino acids, vitamin E, and unsaturated fatty acids. In one long-term study published last year in the British Journal of Nutrition, eating a daily one-ounce serving of nuts was associated with a 50% lower incidence of diabetes, a 30% reduction in heart disease, and a nearly 50% lower incidence of stroke. (Note: the International Nut and Dried Fruit Council helped fund this particular study, but the general health benefits of nuts have been well established.) Before you chow down, beware the "candyfication" of nuts. Skip any that say "candied," "honeyed," or "glazed," and read ingredients lists carefully. "Make sure there aren't any added ingredients, such as sugar and other vegetable oils," Elliot says. "There is no need for oils to be added to nuts because they already have their own!"

Nut butter

 

Those PB&J's your mom put in your lunch bag (and maybe you put in your own kid's now) are also really good for you. In a 2013 study published in Breast Cancer Research Treatment and funded in part by the National Institutes of Health, girls who regularly ate peanut butter between the ages of 9 and 15 were 39% less likely to develop benign breast disease by age 30. Today, you can buy nut butters of all kinds including almond, cashew, and more. "The healthy fats in nut butters can help to keep you full and satisfied," says Elliot. "Just make sure that the nut is the only ingredient listed (along with salt with some brands). Avoid those that have added sugars or vegetable oils."

Coconut oil

 

Coconut oil used to get a bad rap because its calories come predominantly from saturated fats. Now it's receiving some well-deserved vindication, says Elliot. The main type of saturated fat in coconut oil is lauric acid, "which is known for its anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties," says Elliot. "Coconut oil is also unique from other sources of saturated fats because it contains medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) which are metabolized differently—they go straight from the liver to the digestive tract and can then be used as a quick source of energy rather than getting stored. It's also a very stable fat and is great for cooking with high temperatures." For a tasty treat whip up a coconut oil latte

Dark chocolate

 

For years, many of us reserved chocolate for an occasional indulgence. Now we know that a daily chunk of dark chocolate, which is a source of healthy fats, actually protects the heart. Researchers from Louisiana State University reported that when you eat dark chocolate, good gut microbes like Bifidobacterium and lactic acid bacteria feast on it and they grow and ferment it, which produces anti-inflammatory compounds that protect your cardiovascular health. The sweet may also keep you slim. One study published in Archives of Internal Medicine found that folks who eat chocolate five times a week have a lower BMI and are about 6 pounds lighter than those who don’t eat any.

Greek yogurt

 

About 70% of the fat in Greek yogurt is saturated, but you may notice about a gram of trans fat on the label. Not to worry: unless you see partially hydrogenated oil on the ingredients list (which is unlikely), then it's a naturally occurring type of trans fat called conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). "While man-made trans fats are very unhealthy, ruminant trans fats like CLA may help to protect against type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and cancer," Elliot explains. "To get the most bang for your buck when it comes to yogurt, aim for grass-fed, full-fat yogurt. You'll also want to make sure to choose plain yogurt because flavored yogurts are typically full of added sugars and artificial sweeteners." The new guidelines recommend choosing low fat or fat free dairy, including milk, when possible.

Olives

 

The oil from these pressed gems steals the health spotlight, but the fruits themselves deserve a prominent position on stage—and your plate. Naturally, they are rich in oleic acid, the monounsaturated fatty acid that protects your heart. They're also rich in antioxidant polyphenols, which protect you from cell damage, as well as iron, fiber, and copper. "Expand your horizons beyond the ripe black olives found on pizzas," says Leslie Bonci, RD, sports nutritionist at Pittsburgh-based company Active Eating Advice. "Markets have huge olive bars with a wide array of sizes, colors, and textures. Even if you think you don't like olives, there may be a kind you do, you just haven't found it yet." Just keep in mind that they can be high in sodium. The Guidelines recommend no more than 2,300 mg of sodium per day for those 14 and older.

Seeds

 

Seeds are so tiny, it's easy to dismiss them as sprinkles for salads or flavoring for bread. But it's time to regard these crunchy add-ons as more than a garnish and as the nutritional powerhouses they are. Seeds like pumpkin, hemp, flax (grind these in a coffee grinder to release nutrients), chia, and sunflower are rich in monounsaturated fats like omega-3 fatty acids, which suppress inflammation. They're also a good source of protein, fiber, and vitamins and minerals like vitamin E, iron, and magnesium. "Pumpkin seeds have been found to be especially helpful for balancing blood sugar," says Stanford University nutrition scientist Stacy Sims, PhD.

Soybeans

 

Soybeans are one of the few beans that are not only rich in protein, but also a good source of essential fatty acids. So they make a fiber-rich meat substitute. "Soybeans—dried or fresh—are a healthy source of complete protein as well as isoflavones (a form of plant-based estrogen), fiber, and vitamins and minerals," says Bonci. "That's also true for soy milk, miso and tofu." That's not to say veggie corn dogs are a health food, however. "Meat analogs like Fakin Bacon are primarily soy protein without the other healthful components. So choose whole soy foods for health benefits."

Cheese

 

Cheese has long been regarded as dietary villain that packs up your arteries like a stuffed pizza crust. Curbing highly processed, sodium-packed cheese products is still smart, but you can make room for a good cheese plate. In fact, some studies have found that people who regularly eat cheese have lower risk of high LDL cholesterol and heart disease. Aged cheeses like Parmesan are also a good source of probiotics, which promote healthy digestion and weight. "Cheese is full of good nutrients like phosphorous, protein, and calcium that people forget about because of the fat issue," says Sims. "It also increases levels of butyric acid in the body, which has been linked to lower obesity risk and a faster metabolism." One of the healthiest ways to get your cheese fix: As a garnish on a salad. It adds flavor to your bowl, and the fat helps you absorb the nutrients in the veggies.

 

Displaying blog entries 1-5 of 5

Syndication

Categories

Archives

Contact Information

Photo of JoAnn Gadkowski Team Real Estate
JoAnn Gadkowski Team
Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Rocky Mountain Realtors
660 Southpointe #200
Colorado Springs CO 80906
719-339-8909

©2015 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity.