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13 Healthy High-Fat Foods You Should Eat More

Low fat is officially over! Here are more than a dozen high-fat superstars you can and should enjoy as part of your healthy diet.

Selene Yeager

 

Fat is back

 

We don't have to tell you what a disaster the low-fat craze was. We all stopped eating many of our favorite foods thinking they were bad for us (welcome back, eggs and dark chocolate!) and ended up overweight, overly full of refined carbs, and sick. In the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, for the first time in 35 years, the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services removed the limit on total fat consumption in the American diet (though they still recommend getting less than 10% of daily calories from saturated fat). In their words, evidence clearly shows that eating more foods rich in healthful fats like nuts, vegetable oils, and fish have protective effects, particularly for cardiovascular disease. They also help you absorb a host of vitamins, fill you up so you eat less, and taste good, too. Here are 13 healthy high fat foods to stock up on to celebrate.

Types of fat

 

Fat comes in many forms, including:

Unsaturated: Liquid at room temperature and generally considered heart healthy. Found in plants like nuts, seeds, vegetable oils, and seafood.
Saturated: Solid at room temperature and found in animal foods, like meat and butter, as well as coconut and palm oil. Often deemed unhealthy for your heart, but research is equivocal. "Some sources are actually good for us," says Brianna Elliott, RD, a nutritionist based in St. Paul, Minn.
Trans: Liquid fats made solid through a process called hydrogenation. Found in fried foods, baked goods, and processed snack foods. These heart-health wreckers were banned from the food supply in 2015. They'll be gone by 2018.

"What really matters is where the source of fat is coming from. The fats found in processed junk foods and store-bought baked goods aren't so good for us, while fat from more natural foods like avocados, grass-fed beef, and olives can be beneficial" says Elliott.

Olive Oil

 

Olive oil is the original healthy fat. A tall body of research finds that it helps lower your risk for heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Most recently, Spanish researchers publishing in the journal Molecules reported that the various components of olive oil including oleic acid and secoiridoids protect your body on the cellular level to slow the aging process. "To get the most health benefits, choose extra-virgin olive oil, as it is extracted using natural methods and doesn’t go through as much processing before it reaches your plate," says Elliott. Research shows that veggies sautéed in olive oil are also richer in antioxidants than boiled ones—and they taste better too! Don't go crazy though. All fats are relatively high in calories and 1 tablespoon of olive oil has about 120 calories.

Fish

 

You may have heard your mother or grandmother describe fish as "brain food." That’s because these swimmers are brimming with omega-3 fatty acids, which are essential for brain function, says Elliot. "Your brain is made up of mostly fat, so you need to consume them in order to stay sharp and healthy," she says. The new Dietary Guidelines recommend eating 8 ounces per week to get healthy amounts of polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), all of which feed your brain and fight inflammation and chronic disease. If you're concerned about mercury, choose salmon, anchovies, herring, shad

Avocados

 

Avocados do more than provide the keystone ingredient for amazing guac. They also help lower inflammation, which is linked to cardiovascular disease. In a 2014 study, a team of Mexican researchers fed a group of rats too much sugar, which gave them symptoms of metabolic syndrome, including high blood sugar, cholesterol, and triglycerides. They then fed the rats avocado oil, which lowered levels of triglycerides and LDL (bad) cholesterol in their blood, while keeping protective HDL cholesterol levels intact. "You need to consume healthy fats in order for your body to absorb fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K—pair them with a salad so you can reap the benefits of all those veggies!" says Elliot. Keep your overall calorie intake in mind; one avocado is about 320 calories. An easy way to get a good dose is with avocado toast, which can work as a complete breakfast, snack, lunch or even an easy dinner.

Eggs

 

The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines lifted the longstanding hard limit on cholesterol, as many researchers now believe the cholesterol you eat doesn't have that much bearing on the amount of artery-clogging LDL cholesterol floating in your bloodstream, and that saturated fat (like fatty meats) and genetic makeup are the real driving force behind dangerously high cholesterol. That's good news, since research finds that eating eggs in the morning can help you feel full and satisfied longer, making it easier to resist those pastries in your office pantry. "Eggs from hens that are raised on pastures or fed omega-3 enriched feed tend to be higher in omega-3s," says Elliot.

Tree nuts

 

Nuts are nature's most perfect portable snack. Each handful packs a powerhouse of nutrients including amino acids, vitamin E, and unsaturated fatty acids. In one long-term study published last year in the British Journal of Nutrition, eating a daily one-ounce serving of nuts was associated with a 50% lower incidence of diabetes, a 30% reduction in heart disease, and a nearly 50% lower incidence of stroke. (Note: the International Nut and Dried Fruit Council helped fund this particular study, but the general health benefits of nuts have been well established.) Before you chow down, beware the "candyfication" of nuts. Skip any that say "candied," "honeyed," or "glazed," and read ingredients lists carefully. "Make sure there aren't any added ingredients, such as sugar and other vegetable oils," Elliot says. "There is no need for oils to be added to nuts because they already have their own!"

Nut butter

 

Those PB&J's your mom put in your lunch bag (and maybe you put in your own kid's now) are also really good for you. In a 2013 study published in Breast Cancer Research Treatment and funded in part by the National Institutes of Health, girls who regularly ate peanut butter between the ages of 9 and 15 were 39% less likely to develop benign breast disease by age 30. Today, you can buy nut butters of all kinds including almond, cashew, and more. "The healthy fats in nut butters can help to keep you full and satisfied," says Elliot. "Just make sure that the nut is the only ingredient listed (along with salt with some brands). Avoid those that have added sugars or vegetable oils."

Coconut oil

 

Coconut oil used to get a bad rap because its calories come predominantly from saturated fats. Now it's receiving some well-deserved vindication, says Elliot. The main type of saturated fat in coconut oil is lauric acid, "which is known for its anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties," says Elliot. "Coconut oil is also unique from other sources of saturated fats because it contains medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) which are metabolized differently—they go straight from the liver to the digestive tract and can then be used as a quick source of energy rather than getting stored. It's also a very stable fat and is great for cooking with high temperatures." For a tasty treat whip up a coconut oil latte

Dark chocolate

 

For years, many of us reserved chocolate for an occasional indulgence. Now we know that a daily chunk of dark chocolate, which is a source of healthy fats, actually protects the heart. Researchers from Louisiana State University reported that when you eat dark chocolate, good gut microbes like Bifidobacterium and lactic acid bacteria feast on it and they grow and ferment it, which produces anti-inflammatory compounds that protect your cardiovascular health. The sweet may also keep you slim. One study published in Archives of Internal Medicine found that folks who eat chocolate five times a week have a lower BMI and are about 6 pounds lighter than those who don’t eat any.

Greek yogurt

 

About 70% of the fat in Greek yogurt is saturated, but you may notice about a gram of trans fat on the label. Not to worry: unless you see partially hydrogenated oil on the ingredients list (which is unlikely), then it's a naturally occurring type of trans fat called conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). "While man-made trans fats are very unhealthy, ruminant trans fats like CLA may help to protect against type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and cancer," Elliot explains. "To get the most bang for your buck when it comes to yogurt, aim for grass-fed, full-fat yogurt. You'll also want to make sure to choose plain yogurt because flavored yogurts are typically full of added sugars and artificial sweeteners." The new guidelines recommend choosing low fat or fat free dairy, including milk, when possible.

Olives

 

The oil from these pressed gems steals the health spotlight, but the fruits themselves deserve a prominent position on stage—and your plate. Naturally, they are rich in oleic acid, the monounsaturated fatty acid that protects your heart. They're also rich in antioxidant polyphenols, which protect you from cell damage, as well as iron, fiber, and copper. "Expand your horizons beyond the ripe black olives found on pizzas," says Leslie Bonci, RD, sports nutritionist at Pittsburgh-based company Active Eating Advice. "Markets have huge olive bars with a wide array of sizes, colors, and textures. Even if you think you don't like olives, there may be a kind you do, you just haven't found it yet." Just keep in mind that they can be high in sodium. The Guidelines recommend no more than 2,300 mg of sodium per day for those 14 and older.

Seeds

 

Seeds are so tiny, it's easy to dismiss them as sprinkles for salads or flavoring for bread. But it's time to regard these crunchy add-ons as more than a garnish and as the nutritional powerhouses they are. Seeds like pumpkin, hemp, flax (grind these in a coffee grinder to release nutrients), chia, and sunflower are rich in monounsaturated fats like omega-3 fatty acids, which suppress inflammation. They're also a good source of protein, fiber, and vitamins and minerals like vitamin E, iron, and magnesium. "Pumpkin seeds have been found to be especially helpful for balancing blood sugar," says Stanford University nutrition scientist Stacy Sims, PhD.

Soybeans

 

Soybeans are one of the few beans that are not only rich in protein, but also a good source of essential fatty acids. So they make a fiber-rich meat substitute. "Soybeans—dried or fresh—are a healthy source of complete protein as well as isoflavones (a form of plant-based estrogen), fiber, and vitamins and minerals," says Bonci. "That's also true for soy milk, miso and tofu." That's not to say veggie corn dogs are a health food, however. "Meat analogs like Fakin Bacon are primarily soy protein without the other healthful components. So choose whole soy foods for health benefits."

Cheese

 

Cheese has long been regarded as dietary villain that packs up your arteries like a stuffed pizza crust. Curbing highly processed, sodium-packed cheese products is still smart, but you can make room for a good cheese plate. In fact, some studies have found that people who regularly eat cheese have lower risk of high LDL cholesterol and heart disease. Aged cheeses like Parmesan are also a good source of probiotics, which promote healthy digestion and weight. "Cheese is full of good nutrients like phosphorous, protein, and calcium that people forget about because of the fat issue," says Sims. "It also increases levels of butyric acid in the body, which has been linked to lower obesity risk and a faster metabolism." One of the healthiest ways to get your cheese fix: As a garnish on a salad. It adds flavor to your bowl, and the fat helps you absorb the nutrients in the veggies.

 

Memorial Day in Colorado Springs from VisitCOS.com

by VisitCOS.com

See the whole gambit here

Wondering what to do on Memorial Day in Colorado Springs? Head over to Old Colorado City to enjoy live music, delicious food and much more at the annual Territory Days going on all weekend long. Check out these other Colorado Springs Memorial Day Weekend activities for your family to enjoy!

TERRITORY DAYS

One of the most popular Colorado Springs Memorial Day activities is Territory Days. Celebrating 42 years, this free family-friendly event held in Old Colorado City has been bringing in top-notch live performers and entertaining the masses. Enjoy vendor booths with food, drinks, crafts, activities and more..

When: May 27-29, 2017

  • Sat. & Sun. 10 a.m. - 7 p.m.
  • Mon. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Cost: FREE

CREATE CANON CITY BALLOON CLASSIC

The 4th annual Create Canon City Balloon Classic event is held on the grounds of The Winery at Holy Cross Abbey (2951 US Highway 50). Enjoy a great music lineup on Saturday and Sunday along with great food, award winning wines and see the works of local artisans. Watch balloon launches, skydivers and kite flying by Connor Doran. Participate in a 5K Run/Walk on Skyline Drive on Saturday. Kids can launch model rockets and play in the Kids' Zone. Stay in the evening for Balloon Glows and the Abbey Glow.

When: May 27-29, 2017

  • 6:30-8:30 a.m. Balloon launch, weather permitting.
  • 8-9 p.m. Balloon Glow and Abbey Glow
  • Events and vendors throughout the day. 

Cost: FREE admission and Free parking

CHEYENNE MOUNTAIN ZOO

This year’s plant sale at Cheyenne Mountain Zoo  will offer many varieties of grasses, perennials, herbs and more. With plants ranging from perennial favorites to freshly picked additions, you’re sure to find a variety of plants to fit your application and location. All of the plants are Colorado grown, with the majority grown right at Cheyenne Mountain Zoo. Pricing is competitive with garden outlets and all of the proceeds benefit Cheyenne Mountain Zoo. 

When: May 27-29, 2017; 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. daily
Cost:  No Zoo admission is required to attend the plant sale. Plant prices vary.

MEADOWGRASS MUSIC FESTIVAL

3 Days, 20+ Bands, 1 Big Tent! One of Colorado's most eclectic music festivals will be held at the LaForet Conference & Retreat Center in Black Forest. The 9th annual MeadowGrass Music Festival will feature performances from more than 20 national, regional and local artisits, music workshops, yoga, kid's activities, and camping. Bring your blankets and camp chairs - the festival takes place rain or shine.

When: May 26-28, 2017; 10am-10pm
Cost: Ticket prices vary. Please see website for details.

MEMORIAL DAY COMMEMORATION

Evergreen Cemetery Benevolent Society will be hosting a Buffalo Soldier Commemoration at the Spanish American War site from 11:45am-12 Noon with the 10th US Cavalry Buffalo Soldiers. The event begins at approximately 9:30am and will conclude 12:30-1:00pm. Events include the Pikes Peak Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution at 10am, watch historic reenactors, view World War II history displays in the historic Evergreen Chapel and reflect on the lives who gave all. A butterfly release will end the ceremonies at approximately 12:30-1:00pm.

When: May 30, 2016; 9:30am-1pm
Cost: FREE

more info

THE BROADMOOR HOTEL

 

reat the family to an amazing Memorial Day weekend. Enjoy a classic guest room for four nights, one $300 dining credit, one (1 hour) horseback trail ride or one Garden of the Gods Jeep Tour for each person on the package, one time admission to Seven Falls for each person on package, discount on the adult ticket price at the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo and 25% discount on published suite rates.

Offer is based on space availability for limited select dates. Not applicable to groups. Rates do not include applicable taxes and fees.

When: May 25-30, 2017
Cost: Package prices starting at $950 per person for the four nights, based on double occupancy. 

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Check Yourself: 7 Home Maintenance Tasks You Should Tackle in May

 | May 1, 2017

We've been fantasizing about it for months, and finally warmer weather has arrived. We know: You just want to fire up the grill and start working on your tan—we do, too! But before you can kick back in your hammock (or in your pool on your giant patriotic bald eagle float, if that's your thing), there are a few tasks you’ll need to tackle.

And you can bet they're all outside.

“The old adage ‘April showers bring May flowers’ rings true and makes May prime time for landscaping and lawn care in most of the country," says Missy Henriksen, vice president of public affairs for the National Association of Landscape Professionals.

But it goes beyond gardening and yard work. Now's the last chance to take care of all that winter wear and tear and transform your home's outdoor space into something worthy of the host with the most.

The good news? We're here to make it as quick and easy on you as possible—with our handy checklist of home maintenance chores, you can knock them out and get back to that pool float ASAP. We’ve provided tips for doing each task faster and easier—or with the help of a pro.

1. Inspect brick and stone patios and walkways

Task: Freezing temperatures can wreak havoc on hardscape surfaces made of loose (unmortared) brick, stone, and concrete paving materials. Check to see if frost heave and erosion have caused pavers to shift, rise, or sink. You’ll want to fix any unevenness for safety as well as aesthetic reasons.

Shortcuts: Repair hardscape surfaces using a wheelbarrow filled with playground sand and a sturdy trowel. Pry up displaced pavers, smooth and even out the bed with fresh sand, and replace the paver.

Call in the pros: This is a good job for a handyman. Expect to pay $30 to $60 an hour, depending on your location.

2. Feed your lawn

Task: After a wet spring, your lawn might be looking quite rich and lush. Since Mother Nature did the hard work, you can sit back and relax, right? Not so fast. Grass loves nutrients, so now's the time to add high-nitrogen fertilizer to help suppress weeds and keep your lawn looking great all summer.

Shortcuts: A push-powered broadcast spreader makes quick work of fertilizing your lawn. You’ll find spreaders suitable for an average suburban lawn for $35 to $100. If you have a cooking compost pile, you can substitute home-grown compost for commercial fertilizers.

Call in the pros: A lawn care company will spray on a chemical fertilizer for about $40 an application.

3. Repair wood fences and gates

Task: Cycles of cold and wet weather cause wood to move, twist, and warp. That can make garden gates fall out of alignment, and can cause fence pickets to loosen or fall off. Check for signs of loose fencing, and fix sagging gates.

Shortcuts: A cordless battery-powered nail gun ($250) makes quick work of refastening pickets and fence supports. Use only galvanized nails for outdoor work. Use a power drill fitted with a screw tip or a hex driver to remove or tighten loose screws and bolts in gates.

Call in the pros: This is a good job for a handyman. You’ll pay $30 to $60 an hour, depending on your location.

4. Mulch flower and vegetable beds

Task: Prevent evaporation and help keep weeds in check by insulating planting beds with 2 to 4 inches of mulch.

Shortcuts: Set aside a mulching day, and have a landscaping service deliver bulk mulch and dump it where you can get to it easily (like your driveway). Plan on 1 cubic yard of mulch to cover 100 square feet, with mulch 3 inches deep.

Call in the pros: A landscaping service will put in the mulch, but it'll cost you—to the tune of $250 to $560 for 500 square feet, depending on your location.

5. Wash windows

Task: As your yard takes shape and your gardens come into full bloom, you’ll want to see everything clearly. It's time to wash away winter’s dirt and grime from your windows.

Shortcuts: Have a partner clean the outside while you do the inside of the same window. That way, you can identify which side of the glass contains lingering streaks and smudges, and get rid of them on the spot. Plus, who wants to clean alone?

Call in the pros: In addition to cleaning the glass, a professional window washer will remove and clean screens and remove accumulated dirt from sliding tracks for $2 to $7 per window.

6. Get your grill in gear

Task: Nobody wants a rack of ribs with last year's grill gunk on them. Before you fire up the ol' barbecue, make sure your grill is clean and that any gas hoses and connections are secure.

Shortcuts: No matter what kind of grill you have, invest in a grill brush or other coarse cleaning brush, remove the grates and metal plates beneath them, and soak them in hot soapy water for five to 10 minutes. Then scrub hard. To rinse, spray them with the hose.

Cover the area where the grates usually go with foil, and use a stiff grill brush to clean grime from the hood and inside walls. Use a cleaner specifically designed for your grill's surface (e.g., stainless steel, porcelain, or cast iron), and reassemble all parts.

Call in the pros: There are professional grill cleaners who will take your barbecue from slimy to spotless, but it will cost you the equivalent of a few porterhouse steaks. This Denver cleaning service offers quotes from $185 to $279.

7. Make sure your AC is cool

Task: Now's your last chance to double-check your air-conditioning unit and make sure it's in good working order before the mercury starts to rise.

Shortcuts: Hook up a garden hose and spray the outside of the condenser to remove any dust that's settled on the unit and connections. (Yes, dust can affect your AC's effectiveness.) Don’t use a brush, and be careful if pressure washing—you could damage or bend the fins. Make sure to change the filter, too.

Call in the pros: Having a pro service your AC system costs $100 to $250 and includes cleaning the condenser and lubricating the fan motor.

the psychology of color by Homes By Design Magazine

by JoAnn Gadkowski Team

(For full article, click here)

the psychology of color

How to Use Color to Influence Your Mood and Productivity

WRITTEN BY BLAKE MILLER

The five senses are an incredible thing. Smell and taste are two of the most powerful tools at evoking emotion. But sight must not be forgotten. After all, what you see can have an incredible impact on how you feel. Even more so, color can inevitably influence how you feel on an everyday basis without you ever really noticing. Which is exactly why incorporating the most appropriate hues into your own home can have a profound effect on how you feel (or would like to feel) while completing a specific task.

“Color can have a tremendously powerful influence on people’s lives,” explains Sally Augustin, PhD, an environmental/design psychologist and the principal at Design With Science. “I see a lot of people who are scared of it, who create one white space after another.” But, she says, you shouldn’t be afraid of the rainbow. In fact, you should embrace it. “Color is a fantastic tool to utilize in interior design. You can create a mood in a room instantly with the use of color, especially when utilizing it on your walls and in your accessories.” Here, Augustin details the best hues to add to the most common rooms in your home and the feelings they evoke.

 

KITCHEN

It’s no secret that certain colors influence you to eat a little more—and a little less. In fact, a 2012 study out of the Cornell Food and Brand Lab found study participants, who had a low contrast in color between their food and plates—for example, mashed potatoes on a white plate— served themselves 30 percent more food than those whose plates and food were high contrast in color. That same study found that the color of one’s placemat and tablecloth had the same effect. The same can be said for wall color, says Augustin. “Warm colors, generally, do seem to make us feel a little hungrier. They get our appetites flowing,” she says. “You can use this information in one of two ways: if you have children who never eat and weight isn’t an issue for you or your partner, you might want to make spaces like your kitchen or breakfast nook a warm color like an orange or brown. On the other hand, if someone tends to overeat, you would want to avoid those warm colors and opt for cooler hues such as blues and grays.”

BEDROOM

The bedroom is meant for sleep and relaxation and, as such, says Augustin, you want to avoid colors that will excite you such as a color in the red family. “Because of our cultural associations, we view blue as a calming and relaxing color,” she says; however, if a pale blue is not what you’re looking for, Augustin recommends a “color that’s not very saturated but relatively bright. A sage green with lots of white or a dusty blue with lots of white mixed into it are perfect for the bedroom.”

 

color wheel

Pantone is the authority on color. In fact, the color-system company’s forecasted color of the year is so closely watched that industries beyond interior design—think fashion—look to it as one of the biggest trend-setting announcements of the year. Here’s a look at the last five years of colors that Pantone has deemed the “it” hue of the year.

2017: Greenery
Get ready to see plenty of this fern-colored hue as the current color of the year dominates trends.

2016: Rose Quartz and Serenity
Pantone says they chose this pink-and-blue duo to evoke feelings of warmth and tranquility.

2015: Marsala
The company notes that this warm wine color is ideal in a kitchen or dining room.

2014: Radiant Orchid
This shade of purple has fuchsia and pink undertones. The company suggests pairing it with deeper hunter greens, turquoise, teal, or even light yellows.

2013: Emerald
This jewel-tone green hue is ideal in accessories such as dinnerware, or in an entryway or foyer, dining room, home office or library, or a powder room.

HOME OFFICE

If you have a home office, you know that it’s oftentimes a place to brainstorm ideas. Research shows that green can actually get your creative juices flowing. Like the bedroom, Augustin recommends “a sage green that isn’t very saturated in color to achieve that ideal balance that enhances creativity without over-stimulating you.”

EXERCISE ROOM

Need a burst of energy to crank out that workout? Go red! “Seeing the color red gives you a burst of strength,” explains Augustin. “If you have a place in your home where you work out, paint the wall you’re looking at red to have that burst of strength while you exercise.”

5 reasons robots will never replace a Realtor’s job from Inman.com

by JoAnn Gadkowski Team

Read the full article here

5 reasons robots will never replace a Realtor’s job

Last I knew, robots didn't have a gut to check when treading the line on tricky decisions 
 
Apr 7
 

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JoAnn Gadkowski Team
Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Rocky Mountain Realtors
660 Southpointe #200
Colorado Springs CO 80906
719-339-8909

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